2017-05-18 / Guest Column

VIEWS ON DENTAL HEALTH

TMJ Syndrome
GARY S. RAFAL, D. D. S.

Do you live and work under a lot of pressure? Does your jaw ache? These two things may, in fact, be related. Studies have shown that that stress is an important contributing element in a type of jaw problem known as TMJ Syndrom (temporomandibular joint syndrome).

Frequently, patients under stress unconsciously try to reduce tension levels by bruxing (grinding their teeth together at night). Habits like clenching, grinding or bruxing are particularly harmful to the biting surfaces of teeth because they cause unnaturally rapid wear. This in turn may bring about cusp, or biting surface interference, be-tween the upper and lower jaw.

If this occurs, then the TMJ syndrome may develop secondarily to the bruxing. Should bruxing continue once the joint pain is present, the pain and muscle spasms may be very bad. A combination of treatments may be necessary.

From the office of Dr. Gary S. Rafal, 9915 Seaview Avenue. 718-763- 7799.

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