2010-06-10 / Other News

Lincoln Center To Honor P.S. 219 With Imagination Award

During judges’ visit, choral group second graders Myles Julien and Marc Wright watch for Metropoliutan Opera Guild director for cues to join in. During judges’ visit, choral group second graders Myles Julien and Marc Wright watch for Metropoliutan Opera Guild director for cues to join in. Public School 219, in the Canarsie-East Flatbush School District 18, will be honored with Lincoln Center Institute’s Imagination Award 2010 during a presentation by the program’s executive director, Scott Nope-Brandon, at the Kennedy-King School’s commencement exercises at Tilden High School on June 23rd.

Lincoln Center Institute (LCI), a national leader in arts and education, has created the Imagination Award, now in its fourth year, to recognize and highlight imaginative thinking in the teaching and learning practices of New York City’s public schools. This year the award is being presented to a school that “has encouraged and incorporated imaginative thinking across the curriculum, from art to English to the natural sciences.”

As LCI judges watch, (l. to r.)third grade pupils Kamaria King, Senneca Alleyne and Muaeen Alishami engage in a literary lesson. As LCI judges watch, (l. to r.)third grade pupils Kamaria King, Senneca Alleyne and Muaeen Alishami engage in a literary lesson. “Developing students’ imaginations and teaching them to think creatively, a guiding principle of Lincoln Center Institute, is of greatest importance if students are to meet the challenges of today’s world and find a niche in the global economy,” says Noppe-Brandon. “The Kennedy-King School encourages students to observe, question, and engage, and the school uses the arts as a catalyst to richer, more complete learning.”

The LCI staff, which visited P.S. 219 and reported to the panel of Imagination Award judges, witnessed lessons that embodied the LCI Capacities for Imaginative Learning throughout the curriculum.

One second grade class was studying “Fly Away Home” by Eve Bunting. The students’ new understanding of homelessness, derived from the book, resulted in their contributing to a local shelter and to the earthquake relief effort in Haiti.

Judges also visited the Clarkson Avenue school’s Science Fair, where they saw evidence of the children’s ability to frame questions, establish and test hypothesis. Other highlights of the LCI staff visit included classes in partnership with cultural agencies. Fourth graders performed historical raps they had written in the tradition of the social commentary. They studied African griot songs, calypso and early American broadsides. A choral director from the Metropolitan Opera Guild led third graders in original musical compositions inspired by the speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King.

According to P.S. 219’s arts liaison Nancy Wallach, “The imaginative thinking we value in the arts helps inform the best teaching and learning practices in all content areas.”

At the ceremony, Noppe-Brandon will present a banner, a certificate, and a $5000 check to Principal Winsome Smith. Teachers will receive LCI merchandise and the school will be awarded two scholarships for the Lincoln Center Institute International Educator Workshop, a teacher training program offered in the summer at LCI.

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