2005-08-18 / Little Old Canarsie

Golden City: Bought, Burned, Bought Again

Little Old Canarsie
John Denton


Above: Panorama view of Golden City Park in its heyday, around 1907. It burned down and was then rebuilt by William P. Warner, right, one of the great forefathers here, who was later called “Mayor of Canarsie.”  Photos from  Canarsie Historical Society/Brian  Merlis and the Klee collection.
Above: Panorama view of Golden City Park in its heyday, around 1907. It burned down and was then rebuilt by William P. Warner, right, one of the great forefathers here, who was later called “Mayor of Canarsie.” Photos from Canarsie Historical Society/Brian Merlis and the Klee collection. Canarsie was famous the country over for its boating and fishing, being the headquarters of the large shell fish industry of Jamaica Bay form which many thousands of dollars worth of sea food was handles annually, up until April 1st, 1920 when the City of New York banned taking any more due to pollution of the waters. Canarsie was rapidly progressing as an amusement resort. On May 30th, 1907, Golden City, a wonderful temple of pleasure opened to a crowd of some 30,000 patrons, by the Warner Amusement Co., with many great attractions and oddities. Golden City by the Canarsie shore bid fair to smile upon neighbor resorts with equality. It was illuminated by 140,000 lights and offered a free band concert afternoons and evenings, free to the public, with wonderful exhibits foreign to pleasure seekers, such as the only four horned goat in captivity, the smallest horse in the world weighing but twenty-four pounds, and less than three feet high, and many other worthy attractions of interest.

While making preparations for a more auspicious opening in 1909 early on May 8th, a spectacular fire transformed Golden City Park from a beautiful Palace of Pleasure to a gruesome heap of ashes. Far form discouraged, the owner Wm. T. Warner soon had the work of reconstruction under way to make it an attraction for amusement. It was under different managements over the years until 1939, when the Belt Parkway came along right through the Amusement Park, which opened July 1, 1940.

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I love the nostalgia!!

I agree with Sheryl... lots of people (myself included) like reading these historic columns.
Why is The Courier criticising itself for republishing it's own article?

This column is ancient and shouldn't be republished any more.
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