2003-04-03 / Other News

Penn Station To Be Renamed For Late Sen. Daniel Moynihan

Associated Press Writer
By Verena Dobnik
Penn Station To Be Renamed For Late Sen. Daniel Moynihan

Penn Station To Be Renamed For Late Sen. Daniel Moynihan


This photo of the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan was given to Canarsie autograph collector Lou Schlamowitz in 1972, when Moynihan was U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Subsequently, Schlamowitz established a correspondence with Moynihan resulting in a number of letters and more photos following his rise in American politics.This photo of the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan was given to Canarsie autograph collector Lou Schlamowitz in 1972, when Moynihan was U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Subsequently, Schlamowitz established a correspondence with Moynihan resulting in a number of letters and more photos following his rise in American politics.

By Verena Dobnik

Associated Press Writer

The late Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s legacy of tending to the nation’s public works included the planned new Pennsylvania Station, a New York City transportatioin hub that will be renamed in his honor, officials announced last Thursday.

The retired Democratic senator was "the driving force" behind transforming America’s busiest passenger transportation facility, Gov. George Pataki and Mayor Michael Bloomberg said in a joint statement.

The 76-year-old Moynihan died Wednesday from complications stemming from a ruptured appendix.

The new beaux-arts station, scheduled for opening in 2008, will be renamed the Daniel Patrick Moynihan Station.

Over the years, he was the leading advocate of transforming the General Post Office in the landmark James Farley Post Office building into a modern transit terminal that would replace the station now serving about 600,000 travelers each day.

Last August, Moynihan was appointed to the board overseeing the plans.

The neoclassical, 1.4-million-square-foot Farley building sits across Eighth Avenue from the existing Penn Station.

The project was first launched in 1999, but amid budget problems, the Postal Board froze capital spending for the Penn-Farley renovation. Then, after the World Trade Center attack, the Postal Service said it might need to keep its space at the Farley building due to damage at a post office near the twin towers.

But in October, at a press conference attended by Moynihan, officials announced a deal in which the state would buy the post office and convert it into a transportation hub. Purchase of the building is expected to be completed this summer.

Bloomberg has said that the existing Penn Station cannot handle the volume of passengers, and that it represents a national security issue after the Sept. 11 attacks grounded commercial airlines.

The redevelopment will increase the station’s passenger capacity by 30 percent and double the circulation space serving Amtrak, commuter and subway access, as well as buses and taxis.

The mayor and the governor jointly issued the following statement:

"For years, he tried to get the Postal Service out of the Farley building so that New York’s entryway could be as grand as the skyline that surrounds it. His relentless campaign to transform the Farley Post Office into a new Penn Station finally took hold in the last years of his life. Although his endearing humility would never have permitted this while he lived, we will honor his larger than life dreams and their ultimate realization by naming the station in his memory."

In addition to renaming the station, the Pennsylvania Station Redevelopment Corp. will change its name to the Moynihan Station Redevelopment Corp.

A resolution proposing the new names will be introduced to the Empire State Development Corp., the state agency which is coordinating the funding, management and execution of the project.


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