2002-03-14 / Front Page

An Illuminating Tribute (The following was compiled from combined sources and written by Neil S. Friedman)

An Illuminating Tribute (The following was compiled from combined sources and written by Neil S. Friedman)

With the Brooklyn Bridge in the foreground, the "Tribute in Light," a memorial to the victims of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks, lights up the sky above lower Manhattan in this view from Brooklyn at the close of Day of Remembrance ceremonies on Monday that marked six-months since the hijacked airliners crashed into the Twin Towers. 			          				        AP Photo/Daniel P. DerellaWith the Brooklyn Bridge in the foreground, the "Tribute in Light," a memorial to the victims of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks, lights up the sky above lower Manhattan in this view from Brooklyn at the close of Day of Remembrance ceremonies on Monday that marked six-months since the hijacked airliners crashed into the Twin Towers. AP Photo/Daniel P. Derella

The day of remembrance on Monday concluded with the ceremonial illumination of the "Tribute in Light" on a vacant lot near Ground Zero. The memorial consists of two searchlights made up of forty-four spotlights each and projects about a mile into the night sky. The memorial will shine each night from dusk to 11 p.m. through April 13.

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg dedicated the lights in honor of those who lost their lives six months ago in the attacks on the World Trade Center. The mayor was joined by New York State Governor George E. Pataki, former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, renowned opera singer Jessye Norman, and families of those lost on September 11th, including Valerie Webb, age 12, who lost her father, Nathaniel Webb, a Port Authority Police Officer.

"The time between the first and second plane is just a brief moment in our lives,’’ Mayor Michael Bloomberg told a crowd of several hundred who gathered at Battery Park, just blocks from Ground Zero. "We have to go on and we will go on...We cannot let our guard down ever again. We must remember."

Bloomberg asked them to "look into your hearts to remember those that are no longer with us and also to think about how we can go forward, never forget those that we lost, but also to build the kind of future that they will want for all of us."

During the short ceremony, which took place at 6:55 p.m., opera star Jessye Norman sang a moving rendition of "America the Beautiful," while the 12-year-old illuminated the "Tribute in Light." In addition to losing her father on September 11, Valerie also had lost her mother, a registered nurse, in July 2000 due to a sudden heart attack.

When the Day of Remembrance began earlier in the day, silence fell at Ground Zero, exactly six months after hijacked jetliners obliterated two of the world’s tallest buildings.

Twice - at 8:46 a.m. and 9:03 a.m. - mourners near the World Trade Center ruins observed moments of silence, marking the precise times when the planes crashed into the towers.

At the same time, President Bush held a solemn ceremony on the White House South Lawn, joined by more than 100 ambassadors, as well as relatives of some victims and members of Congress.

The president said Sept. 11 was a day when the world "was stirred to anger and to action" over terrorism. "And the terrorists will remember Sept. 11 as the day their reckoning began," he said.

At Battery Park, Governor George Pataki said "we saw the face of evil" on September 11.

"And yet Sept. 11 will also stand for our response, which was to respond to evil with good, to respond to terror with love," he added.

At police precincts citywide, including the 69th Pct. on Rockaway Parkway, the names of the 23 officers killed were read aloud at 8:30 a.m.

Assistant Chief Joseph Fox issued a statement, which read in part, "In our city’s darkest hour, when they were called upon to act, they did so with great valor, and inb the highest tradition of the New York Coity Police Department."

During the Battery Park ceremony, city officials also dedicated a sculpture damaged in the Sept. 11 attack as a temporary memorial to the victims.

"The Sphere,’’ a steel and bronze sculpture that stood in the fountain of the trade center plaza, was gashed and partially crushed by falling debris. It was created in 1971 by artist Fritz Koenig and was dedicated as a monument to world peace through international trade.

"The sphere may be damaged..." Bloomberg said, "but the real memorial will be in our hearts."

Bloomberg said the globe probably would serve as a centerpiece for a permanent memorial.

Return to top

Copyright© 2000 - 2014
Canarsie Courier Publications, Inc.
All Rights Reserved