2001-04-26 / Other News

Our Town In The ’20s — A Bird’s Eye View

As the Canarsie Courier came into being in 1921, the community was already showing signs of growing. The above photo, courtesy of the Canarsie Historical Society and the Brian Merlis collection, shows the northern portion of Rockaway Parkway, looking south from Farragut Road.As the Canarsie Courier came into being in 1921, the community was already showing signs of growing. The above photo, courtesy of the Canarsie Historical Society and the Brian Merlis collection, shows the northern portion of Rockaway Parkway, looking south from Farragut Road.
Through editorials, the Canarsie Courier was responsible for seeing the old 69th Precinct stationhouse (above) torn down and a new headquarters constructed on Foster Avenue.Through editorials, the Canarsie Courier was responsible for seeing the old 69th Precinct stationhouse (above) torn down and a new headquarters constructed on Foster Avenue.In its heyday, the above-pictured Golden City Park, located at the foot of our community and at the shore of the great Jamaica Bay, was the focus of social life for many during the summer, matching, to some degree, nearby Coney Island.                          Vintage photos from Canarsie Historical Society-Brian MerlisIn its heyday, the above-pictured Golden City Park, located at the foot of our community and at the shore of the great Jamaica Bay, was the focus of social life for many during the summer, matching, to some degree, nearby Coney Island. Vintage photos from Canarsie Historical Society-Brian Merlis

A short time after the Courier came into existence, the oyster and clam business, which flourished here for years, went out of business because the city said the waters in Jamaica Bay were polluted. Thus, most of the fishing fleets, like the above in Steamboat Creek, were forced to close foever, putting hundreds of Canarsiens out of work.A short time after the Courier came into existence, the oyster and clam business, which flourished here for years, went out of business because the city said the waters in Jamaica Bay were polluted. Thus, most of the fishing fleets, like the above in Steamboat Creek, were forced to close foever, putting hundreds of Canarsiens out of work.

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