2001-04-19 / Top Stories

Illegal Trucks Bringing "Quakes" To Area Residents

Illegal Trucks Bringing "Quakes" To Area Residents

Illegal Trucks Bringing "Quakes" To Area Residents

Too many truckers  ignore sign at the corner which prohibits their traffic on E. 108th Street. 						   Charles RogersToo many truckers ignore sign at the corner which prohibits their traffic on E. 108th Street. Charles Rogers

By Charles Rogers

Picture this: You’re sitting in your comfortable home on Flatlands 6th Street bordering East 108th Street when a rumbling seemingly similar to a mild earthquake starts shaking the house. A moment later, the rumbling stops, only to be followed by another, then another.

The shaky incidents of rumbling, rattling and rolling seem to slow down at about sundown, but start again the following day.

According to East 108th Street residents — and those living on adjacent Flatlands streets connected to it — the cause of the rumbling is not anything so devastating as a temblor; it’s simply buses and trucks traversing the long north-south street; unauthorized, illegal buses and trucks.

One Flatlands 6th Street resident wants the police to do something about it — and soon.

Seymour Weiner says it’s becoming unbearable.

"We’ve been trying to talk to anyone with authority to try to get trucks and, yes, city buses from using East 108th Street," he told the Canarsie Courier recently. "I’ve talked to Captain Brian White of the 69th Precinct on a number of occasions and he says the Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) has been contacted to do more evaluations on the street. Until that time, we have to be careful crossing, because of speeding drivers, and we have to watch out for huge trucks."

The trucks are violating a "no truck" rule on the street, which runs from Flatlands Avenue more than 14 blocks south to Seaview Avenue. A few years ago, the D.O.T. erected a stop sign at the corner of Avenue N to stop speeders but, after a matter of about three months, the sign was taken down.

"Nobody knew it was there, at first," said one resident of the area, "and the police gave out a bunch of tickets, but they took the sign down for some reason."

Captain White, the local precinct’s executive officer, says, while he sees no reason for buses to use the street, there is no law barring them.

"We’re also keeping an eye on the amount of speeders in the area," said Captain White, "by creating some speed traps. In a way, it’s good that the street has a few bumps in it, so speeders might be discouraged."

Weiner says speeders are "a definite problem."

At this point, Weiner and his neighbors say the only way they can get something done about the trucks and the speeding is to continue to let police and city officials know about the problem.

Unless somebody gets injured or, perhaps, killed there.

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